-


Ginger Cultural Practices: No planting material available
 
There are many different ways of growing ginger. First the grower should know the characteristics of Ginger, its preference and ideal condition for growing and producing.
 
The habitat most suited to the cultivation of ginger is one with a hot and moist climate, sunlight with some shade; ginger also prefers soil that is well tilled and rich in loam. The land should be well drained.
 
We present to you the different cultural practices currently adopted by ginger growers and producers.
 
1.   Common farmer’s field planting.
2.   Trench culture
3.   Pot culture.
4.   Green house poly-bag culture.
5.   Bunker culture
 
Common Farmers’ Field Planting:
This is an age old practice of growing ginger. The field is cleared. Organic compost and chopped vegetation and decomposed animal manure is spread on the field. Plowed deep (6-8 inches) crosswise and harrowed two times to pulverize the soil, mix the compost and level the field. Then make shallow furrow 50 cms. distance. Place basal organic and complete fertilizer along the furrow. Pre-germinate the ginger seed-pieces by cutting rhizomes with  1-3  eye buds, wash them thoroughly and place in plastic or jute sack to germinate in 7to 8 days. Plant the pre germinated seed-pieces at 20 cms. apart in the row and covered with 1-2 inches soil. See to it that the soil is moist preferably after a good rain, or irrigate the field. Mulch the field with grasses, coconut leaves,  thick enough to entirely cover the soil surface to prevent weed seeds from growing, to conserve moisture and prevent chickens and other animals from disturbing the growth of the ginger. Monitor the growth of the ginger. If there are areas or dead spots, replant them to fill the area. Let them grow. Spray HOC (Herbal Organic Concentrate) weekly or every 15 days to  maintain vigor, growth and protection against pests and diseases. Harvest of pickling ginger may be done in 4 to 8 months. For replanting rhizomes, they have to be matured at 11 to 12 months or more. From time to time the vegetative parts (leaves) mature and die, but new flushing and vegetation grow, expanding the development of new rhizomes. Farmers usually leave their ginger alone and come to harvest when the market price is good enough.
 
Trench Culture:
This is similar to the fist farmers’ practice, except in the land preparation. Instead of just plowing and furrowing, the grower make a trench of 1 foot wide and two feet deep and as long as he wishes. Fill the trench with compost, organic waste, plant residue, rice straw and carbonized rice hull, with decomposed animal manure mixed with fertile top soil. Tamper and press the materials. Then place 2 to 3 inches of top soil. Plant the pre germinated ginger seed pieces double row at 6 inches apart. Cover with much of grass, rice straw or coconut leaves. Spray HOC (Herbal Organic Concentrate) weekly or every 15 days to  maintain vigor, growth and protection against pests and diseases. Irrigate if the soil is drying.   
 
Pot Culture:
This is done in urban areas where there is not much space. A growing media is prepares with an equal mixture of fertile top soil, decomposed animal manure, decompose plant organic matter, coconut coir dust, carbonized rice hull and guano. Place the mixture at 2/3 of the pot and plant the ginger seed-pieces. When the ginger grow every month add more of the mixed growing media until the pot is full. Water every time the soil get dry. Spray HOC (Herbal Organic Concentrate) weekly or every 15 days to  maintain vigor, growth and protection against pests and diseases. The leaves of the ginger may be harvested, chopped and included in cooking food. The rhizomes may be harvested at will and need.
 
Greenhouse poly-bag culture:
This is similar to the Pot culture, except you use big thick and strong poly-bags. They are place in a greenhouse or under a netting to provide partial shading. Ginger does not like too much exposure to sunlight especially during summer months. A growing media is prepares with an equal mixture of fertile top soil, decomposed animal manure, decompose plant organic matter, coconut coir dust, carbonized rice hull and guano. Place the mixture at one foot of the bag, ass 2 inches of pure fertile top soil and plant the ginger seed-pieces. As the ginger grows every month add more of the mixed growing media until the pot is full. Water when the soil starts getting dry. Spray HOC (Herbal Organic Concentrate) weekly or every 15 days to maintain vigor, growth and protection against pests and diseases. When the bag is full and rhizomes are fully mature, they are ready for harvest in 12 months. However at 4-8 months, they are ready for the pickling and may be harvested, just leave some growing pieces to continue on the growth and production of more rhizomes. Growers will have a choice as to when to harvest, depending on market prices and demand.
 
Bunker culture:
This culture surprised may farmers and Agriculturist. However, we have to study and find its merits or demerits.  
This is done by digging a deep bunker (trench) 1-2 meters wide, 4-4 meters long and 8 feet deep. One foot of organic compost is place at the bottom, then 2-3 inches of top soil, where the pre germinated ginger seed-pieces are planted. Bakers yeast powder is spread to encourage growth and control pathogens that may rot the ginger. HOC (Herbal Organic Concentrate) sprayed to the bed and germinating ginger plants every month during adding of compost growing media. The top of the bunker is completely covered with strong bamboo flooring, covered by kalakat, covered by plastic sheet and finally covered with soil. A small window on top is provided for monitoring. Some do it air tight while others place bamboo breather. Some say never open the covering in at least 9 months. Others claim the ginger rhizomes will just grow and grow until the pit of bunker is full and start pushing the covering upward in about one year. As to the truth and proof, we still have to see a good harvest. Different practices have been observed. Many unsuccessful growers are losing their investment. So this practice need closer study and observation by professional agriculturists.